Skip to main content

Full text of ""The Crescent" Student Newspaper: 1922-24"

See other formats


Gsorge Fax CoSsp 
Archives 



THE CRESCENT I 



VOLUME XXXIV 



NBWBERG, OREGON, JUNE 13, 1923 



NUMBER 16 



J 



THE SPIRITUAL LIFE IS 
VAST ENTERPRISE 

Students Must Cultivate Generous 
Spirit Says Dr. lee 



SENIOR CLASS PROGRAM 
SCORES BIG HIT 

High Class Flays and Clever Acting" 
Pleases Crowd 



The Baccalaureate services for 
the graduating classes of the College 
and Academy, 1923, were held in the 
Friends church, at eleven o'clock 
Sunday morning, Jun e 10. Rev. 
George H. Lee, pastor of the Pres- 
byterian church, Newberg, delivered 
the sermon. "Be still and know that 
I am God" was the text appropriate- 
ly chosen for the occasion. Rever- 
end Lee, emphasized the spiritual 
life as a vast enterprise, far out- 
stripping that of our grandest hu- 
man endeavors. Though our tem- 
poral enterprises are important in 
every sense, the college man and 
woman must have a knowledge of 
that great source of all strength, 
God, if they would give the best of 
which they are capable. 

To graduate from college is to ar- 
rive at a goal. A goal that has re- 
quired pluck and hard labor to at- 
tain. "When congratulations are 
extended to the graduate, it is no 
mere formality, it is reality," as- 
serted Reverend Lee. It is a recog- 
nition of an accomplished end. Not ' 
only is there the hard labor and 
other physical obstacles to overcome, 
but there is as well the temptation 
to suspend preparation and plunge 
into the fray of life where there is | 
so much need. Here Reverend Lee 
Illustrated from his own experience ■ 
the temptation to leave his work in 
school, that he might sooner bring 
aid to those who were in need. An 
influence unseen but wisely guiding, 
kept him moving toward the goal 
that was necessary in his work. 

To be still and know God, is ap- 
propriate for the graduation time. 
It is the time of review; when our 
four years of work must be consid- 
ered for its true value. Has it been 
good? Have we played when work 
should have been done? Are there 
defects in the structure? If there 
are defects they must be repaired; 
a process that has been provided by 
a wise and just Providence, said 
Reverend Lee. 

At this point Reverend Lee took 
up the matter of college activities, 
which may be detrimental to the 
student life, if indulged in unwisely. 
No on e goes to college to learn to 
play football, baseball and other 
sports primarily, but rather to ad- 
vance one's intellectual life. Sports, 
and gymnastic exercises are essen- 
tial to the student life when wisely 
used. 

Finally, as the graduate goes out 
into the world to deal with the real- 
ities of life, he must have about him 
that atmosphere of generosity and 
helpfulness that will transfer for 
the better that with which he conies 
in contact. This atmosphere which 
we all carry about us, is good or 
evil; It poisons or revives those 



(Continued on page four) 



One of the best class days in Pa- 
cific's history was given before an 
unusually large audience last Mon- 
day evening. The program showed 
splendid planning and the expendi- 
ture of much time and effort. The 
numbers were well chosen and ex- 
cellently rendered and gave the au- 
dience a great deal of pleasure. 

The program as listed was: 

I. In Memoriam. 

II. Suppressed Desires — A Freud- 
ian comedy by Susan Glaspell and 
George C. Cook. Henrietta Brewster 
— Harriett Hodgin. Steve, her hus- 
band — Richard Haworth. Mabel, 
Henrietta's sister — Flora E. Camp- 
bell. 

III. The Travelling man. A 
modern miracle play, by Lady Greg- 
ory. Mother — Gladys M. Scott. 
Travelling Man — Theodore Cramlett. 
Child — Bertram Miller. 

IV. Just a Moment! 

The seniors in cap and gown for- 
mally presented the ashes and the 
picture of "Old Bruin," received 
from last year's class, and the key 
to the senior locker to the junior 
class "In Memoriam." 

"Suppressed Desires," a clever two 
scene comedy, was an instant success 
in the eyes of the audience. The 
play was clever in itself and the 
acting and atmosphere of the mem- 
bers participating rendered it even 
more acceptable. 

"The Travelling Man" was a 
modern miracle play. The simplicity 
and sacred sentiment of the plot 
made it extremely difficult to pro- 
duce, but it was well handled and 
its atmosphere accenuated by the 
lighting effect permeated the au- 
dience and found its truest expres- 
sion in silence. 

Excellent entertaining was done 
between the listed numbers. Blythe 
Owen Cramlett gave several piano 
solos in her usual efficient and pleas- 
ing manner. Gladys Scott, assisted 
by Delight Carter, gave two clever 
pianologues with gratifying results. 
Flora Campbell read a selection from 
"The Four Million" by O. Henry. 
Harriett Hodgin expressed the ap- 
preciation of the class to its friends 
who had so loyally aided to the pres- 
entation of the evening's perform- 
ance. 

"Just a Moment!" The climax of 
the evening came when Richard lead 
out Old Bruin and requested the 
juniors to call for him after the 
crowd had dispersed. The surprise 
of the audience was great as it was 
a firm belief that Old Bruin had been 
reduced to ashes. The greeting he 
received was hearty if a trifle bewil- 
dered at first. Although many were 
too stunned to applaud. 

Altogether the class day program 
was a decided success and extremely 



FOURTH YEARS RECEIVE 
THEIR DIPLOMAS 

Class Is Lauded by President Pen- 
nington for Splendid Work 

Amid a profusion of flowers, mar- 
guarites and batchelor buttons inter- 
woven with the restful green of 
many ferns that decorated the stage, 
the Academy and Commercial class- 
es of 1923, led by Professor C. L. 
Conover, principal of the Academy, 
and President Levi T. Pennington 
who delivered the graduating ad- 
dress, faced for the last time as 
fourth years, the students, friends 
and relatives who had gathered to 
j witness the successful termination 
; of their preparatory work in educa- 
tion. 

I Professor Conover opened the pro- 
gram with a few introductory re- 

' marks, after which Reverend George 
F. Round offered the invocation. A 

I vocal duet by Miss M. Eunice Lewis 
and Professor R. W. Lewis followed, 
rendered in the Lewis's most pleas- 
ing and capable manner. Professor 
Alexander Hull accompanied on the 
piano. 

President Pennington began by 
lauding the excellent scholarship of 
the two classes which ranked higher 
than the average class from prep- 
aratory school. "We shall be proud 
of this class as the years pass, as we 
are proud of then now," predicted 
President Pennington. Drawing 
upon his abundant fund of knowl- 
edge of athletics, and using as a 
theme the necesssity of training 
under skilled leadship for the game 
of life, even as the athlete needs to 
train for the game of sports, Presi- 
dent Pennington said: "Not one 
man in a thousand is up to his max- 
imum strength in physical develop- 
men in the average walks of life." 
There are three things that we must 
strive to develop if we become At 
and approach the maximum of effi- 
ciency, strength, speed and skill. 
After these three elements have been 
properly developed, we must add an- 
other very important element .that 
of team work. Team work is essen- 
tian to the victory. No matter how 
fast a player may be, whenever he 
breaks away from the interference 
of his teammates, he plays a losing 
game. Morally, spiritaully, intel- 
lectually, and physically, we are be- 
low the maximum. In each of these 
factors of life we must acquire the 
three elements previously mentioned. 

"There is a second element of 
preparation for the game of life," 
said President Pennington, "and 
that is how to conserve preparation." 
Every ounce of strength must be 
conserved for use in the final drive 
of the game when victory may be 
won only by the most nerve trying 
test. Some fail to deliver the best 
that is in them at this stage of the 
game, and defeat is certain. "Don't 
lose your head" "Don't lose your 



(Continued on page four) 



CLASS '23 GRADUATES 
WITH HIGH HONORS 

Commencement Speaker Stresses 
Need for Christian Leadership 



(Continued on page three) 



Under a canopy of green composed 
of maple leaves, which covered the 
whole rear of the platform, and a 
sea of many colored roses nestling 
harmoniously among the green maple 
leaves to the front, the college class 
of 1923, received with distinct hon- 
or their reward for the four years 
of toil that has prepared them for 
the battle of life. 

A stirring address was given by 
Milo S. Hinkle, field secretary of the 
Five Years Meeting of Friends 
in America. The need for trained 
Christian leadership was emphasized 
by Mr. Hinkle, who brought many 
illustrations to prove that the need 
is not only great, but that the busi- 
ness world, the industrial, and all 
other fields are crying out for Chris- 
tian trained men and women. 

Mr. Hinkle firs t gave attention to 
the church, which has been prone to 
use too many who were intellectully 
unprepared for the task of spreading 
the gospel of Good Will. The pre- 
senting of a Bible text correctly is 
as important as the preparation of 
a lesson in school. With the church 
rests the future safety of the civili- 
zation of the world. Here the 
speaker quoted David Lloyd George, 
the eminent British statesman who 
.has said: "If the churches allow 
another war to come, they had as 
well close their doors, because the 
next war will be a war against civ- 
ilization." Mr. Hinkle also quoted 
Roger Babson the noted statistician 
who declares, that the principles of 
Christ's sermon on the mount must 
be instilled into the business life if 
we would arrive at a just equable 
basis of exchange. 

All walks of life, even those men 
trained in the art of destruction; 
the military, recognize that Chris- 
tian character and principles must 
be maintained to bring about peace 
among men. The church should be 
felt in every walk of life according- 
ly, not alone 1n the field of religion 
as has been too long supposed. This 
preparation is the work of such col- 
leges as Pacific, the Christian insti- 
tution. 

Mr. Hinkle stressed following the 
ideal in life; and typfied Christ as 
the great guide and leader. To be 
willing to follow this leader and 
ideal was half the victory, for as the 
speaker suggested there are two 
ways of life; one self-seeking, the 
other the Christ way. Jesus said 
"follow me;" and straightway they 
left their tasks and came, obedient 
to His call. And Jesus was aware 
of the meaning of this act; for had 
he not fished in the sea of Gallilee, 
and worked to help provide for the 
family at his father's home? He 
knew these practical problems, and 

(Continued on page three) 



COMMENCEMENT NUMBER 



THE CRESCENT 



Entered as second-class mail matter 
at post office at Newberg, Ore. 



Published Semi-Monthly during 
the college year by the Student 
Body of Pacific College, Newberg, 
Oregon. 



Ben Darling Editor-in-Chief 

Olive Terrell Associate Editor 

Flora Campbell Society Editor 

Cecil P. Hlnshaw Sports Editor 

Alfred Everest . . . Business Manager 
Gertrude Bates ..Circulation Mgr. 

Reporters — Charlotte Jones, Ruth 
Lee, Allie Smith, Luella Clough, 
Mary Elliott. Gladys Scott, Helen 
Hester, Marie Hester, Ivor Jones, 
Rosa Abeisher. 



Terms: |1.00 the Year in Advance. 
Single Copy 10c. 



ANOTHEE STEP FORWAED 

Pacific has just closed another 
year; probably her most successful 
year, if we consider the increased 
enrollment, the additions to the cur- 
riculum, the new department of 
physical education and, increased 
sports; the new equipment and ful- 
filment of all requirements for stan- 
dardizing except one slight feature 
In the endowment, which shall be 
remedied next year beyond question 
of a doubt. And in the whole life 
of the College we have seen a 
breadth and a depth of such sub- 
stantial character, that we feel en- 
couragement along the entire line. 
— — — — o 

PACIFIC OR — ? 

Well this year is over what about 
next year? Are we coming back to 
Pacifiic or, are we going to a bigger 
school? Nearly every student ar- 
rives at the place where he thinks 
the small school cramps his intelli- 
gence. Pacific, can't give courses of 
a highly technical nature, and the 
student wanting such a program 
must attend the large school of 
course. But for a broad and general 
education, and for preparation for 
higher work or specialization, Pa- 
cific takes her place in the front 
rank of smaller schools. Let's come 
back next year, and bring one or 
more students with us and help Pa- 
cific College grow. 

o 

MANNERS IN PUBLIC 

There are always a few black 
sheep in every flock it seems. We 
are not refering to anything very 
serious. There ar e so many good 
books on etiquette that we refrain 
from saying much about it. If we 
were going to write one however, 
we should emphasize the chapter on 
"How to behave at a public enter- 
tainment," unless it was one of those 
kind of entertainments that make 
no demand upon personal behavior. 
We think a fellow who is old enough 
to attend college should be intelli- 
gent enough to act properly in pub- 
lic, even if he don't have to at home. 
A little more dignity, a little more 
consideration for others, and a wee 
touch of common sense is all that's 
necessary. 

o 

MORE MUSCLE MEDICINE 

"Ted" Cramlett is coming back 
next year. We're glad he is, because 
he did some good work the past year. 
As head of the same department for 
another year there ought to be a 
big gain in physical education. 

o 

THE BURIED TALENT 

The dramatic work of both the 
College and Academy classes has 
been remarkably artistic. Confined 
to the two graduating classes, it 
speaks well for the ability of our 



students. This talent has lain bur- 
ied too long at our college and 
should be developed. 



REMEMBEE THE CRESCENT 

Next year we hope to see the Cres- 
cent in a great many homes of the 
Yearly Meeting. The Crescent must 
not lag behind the widening influ- 
ence of the college; in reality it 
ought to lead if anything. The 
members of the Yearly Meeting who 
support the school should read the 
Crescent and keep in touch with col- 
lege activities. 

o 

LET'S DO THIS 

One greatly needed improvement 
in the physical education depart- 
ment, is the matter of bathing and 
dressing facilities. 

We hope that the new department 
will result finally in the erection of 
a new gymnasium, that shall be a 
credit to the college, and a service 
to the whole community But in the 
meantime temporary arrangements 
should be made to accommodate the 
athletes at the "gym" instead of the 
Boys' dormitory. 



WE THANK YOU 

In closing our editorial work for 
the summer, we want to express our 
appreciation for the aid rendered by 
students and faculty in helping 
make the Crescent as good as it was. 
We hope to improve rapidly as we 
learn how to do things better. 
o 

TREFIAN 

The grand out-door picnic which 
was held by Treflan on the afternoon 
of May 31, in room 14 was an un- 
qualified success. Sounds indicative 
of a gambling den might have been 
heard by the passer-by — but it was 
only the shuffling of rook cards, or 
the clack of dominoes being over- 
turned. Dominoes proved to be so 
fascinating that the girls at that 
particular table almost forgot to go 
home. And when the refreshments 
arrived, it was with difficulty that 
attentions were wrested from par- 
ches! or rook. Delicious strawberry 
sundae and wafers soon overcame in- 
terest in less substantial things. Th e 
following girls received the much- 
longed-for Treflan T.: Florence 
Lee, Gladys Scott, Helen Baird, Iva 
Dell Crozer, Mildred Hadley, Olive 
Armstrong, Murl Clarke, Elizabeth 
Silver, Hazel Newhouse, Ruth Whit- 
lock, Esther Haworth, Mary Pen- 
nington and Helen Baird. 

o 

HULLS GIVE SPLENDID RECITAL 

The annual commencement recital 
of the Hulls, occurred on Saturday 
evening, June 9, at Wood-Mar hall. 
A large and appreciative audience 
was in attendance. Each number 
was rendered with the usual artistic 
skill of the Hulls. It would be hard 
to discriminate between the numbers 
as to able rendition, with the pos- 
sible exception of the reading, "The 
Belfry of Bruges," accompanied by 
Mrs. Hull at the piano. This read- 
ing from Longfellow, has been given 
by Professor Hull before this time, 
but never in so perfect a manner as 
in the commencement recital. 

The imitation of the chimes 
brought out by Mrs. Hull on the 
piano was truly realistic and added 
powerfully to Professor Hull's ex- 
pression. 

o 

PERSONALS 

Marjorie Brown recently arrived 
home from Greenleaf where she has 
been teaching and visited the col- 
lege. 

Claude Lewis was back for com- 
mencement in time to attend the as- 
sociation reception. 



Patronize Crescent advertisers. 



GLEE CLUB RENDER'S 

EXCELLENT PROGRAM 



Music lovers of Newberg and vi- 
cinity were well entertained Monday 
night. May 25, at Wood-Mar hall by 
the Ladies Glee Club of Pacific Col- 
lege. .An orchestra of seven pieces 
ably assisted the girls while the 
readings given by Miss Florence 
Lee, the violin solo by Winona 
Smith, and the songs by Professor 
Hull, added interest and variety to 
the program. 

The following numbers were 
given: 

1. Minuet Beethoven 

Chorus and Orchestra 

2 Violin solo . . Liebeslied . . Kreisler 

Winona Smith 

3 Pilgrims Chorus Wagner 

Amaryllis. .Air de Roi Louis XIII 

Chorus 

4 When she was young. D. Hardelot 
Ma little banjo Dicknuionb 

Alexander Hull 

5 Cradle song Shubert 

In the book Grieg 

Hard Trials .... Negro Spiritual 

Chorus 

6 My Financial Career .... 

.... Stephen Leacock 

The Dual Eugene Field 

Florence Lee 

7 Moonlight Meadows . . Czibulka 

Chorus 

8 Trio in A Minor Bohm 

Orchestra 

9 God of All Nature . . Tschaikowsky 

Chorus and Orchestra 
The members of the Glee Club are 
Winona Smith, Helen Hester, Lucille 
Ehret, Gertrude Rice, Rose Ellen 
Hale, Bernice Hinshaw, Alice Lau- 
dien, Helen Nordyke, Mary Penning- 
ton, Mary Eunice Lewis, Grace Con- 
over, Murl Clarke, Florence Lee, 
Leona Brown, Louise Nelson, Gert- 
rude Bates, Mildred Birks, Johanna 
Gerrits and Elizabeth Silver. 

Orchestra: Violin, Clifton Par- 
rett. Royal Gettman, Herbert Owen, 
and Winona Smith; cellos, Mrs. 
Blythe Owens Cramlett, Mr. Chester 
Jones, and Professor Alexander Hull. 
Mrs. Hull, accompanied on the piano. 

The Hulls have been the success- 
ful directors of the Glee Club and 
Orchestra throughout the season. 
o 

CHAPEL NOTES 

Following the announcements by 
President Pennington, the first of 
Monday Chapel was devoted to the 
College's annual extemperaneous 
speaking contest. ThOBe taking part 
were Miss Flora E. Campbell, Miss 
Lucille Clough, and Miss Reta Han- 
son. Each contestant presented her 
subject in a very interesting manner 
which showed concentrated study, 
considering the short time allowed 
to each for preparation. Miss Camp- 
bell was awarded first place and 
doubtless has won the privilege of 
having her name carved on the old 
pulpit which has already engraved 
upon it a list of college immortals. 

President Pennington, then sug- 
gested that as moving-up day was a 
yearly event it would be necessary to 
carry the custom out. However, be- 
fore the suggestion was acted upon, 
the Student Body was wished the 
best of luck in the coming examina- 
tions by President Pennington, and 
the sincere wish that each one might 
return to Pacific again next year. 
Moving up was successfully accom- 
plished with the exception of one 
unforeseen difficulty. The faculty 
had been thoughtlessly excluded. 
Eventually Professor Conover solved 
the problem by suggesting that as 
the Academy first year seats had 
been vacated, it would relieve the 
situation and please everyone if the 
faculty would move up to the 
empty seats. The faculty members 
enthusiastically carried out the sug- 
gestion, thereby creating another 
unsolvable problem. No one has 
been found to take the place of the 
faculty. 



Black 122 



Office White 22 



DR. H. C. DIXON 
DENTIST 



CITY GROCERY 
Call Black 231 for Fresh Fruits 
and Vegetables and Your 
Grocery Wants 

714 FIRST STREET 



College Students are Always Wel- 
come at 

THE REX ATX STOEE 
Lynn B. Ferguson 
PRESCRIPTION DRUGGIST 



VINCENT'S FEED STOEE 

808 First Street 

Best Quality of 
FEED AND FLOUR 



GEO. WARD'S BARBEE SHOP 
Satisfaction 
Guaranteed 

NEXT TO YAMHHiL ELECTRIC 



BAGS 
TRUNKS and GLOVES 

703 First Street 
A. C. SMITH 



VISIT THE FAIR 
5c and 10c Store 
WALLACE & SON 



607 First St. 



Newberg, Ore. 



STUDENTS 

For the easiest shave and 
most up-to-date hair cut, 
go to 

JAMES McGUIRE 

OPPOSITE THE POST OFFICE 



PARLOR PHARMACY 

H. A. COOLEY. Prop. 

Ice cream and candies. We fea- 
ture the famous Lowney's Candies. 
Kodaks, Cameras and Supplies. 



An Electric Washing Machine 
Makes LABOR DAY a pleasantry 

YAMHILL ELECTRIC CO. 

"IT SERVES YOU RIGHT" 
V. J 

t \ 

SOCIETY AND COMMERCIAL 

Printing 

AT THE GRAPHIC OFFICE 



ALBANY TIGERS TAKE REVENGE 

Pacific lost to Albany college on 
June 1, by a score of 8 to 4, the 
game taking place at Albany. The 
whole story can be told in three 
words. Too much pitcher. Beamis, 
Albany's lanky moundsman, struck 
out twenty-one of his opponents. 
However, he was not invincible, as 
two errors, a double, a triple and a 
single in the second inning gave the 
Quakers four runs. They held a 4 
to 2 lead until the seventh when Al- 
bany made three on two walks and 
five singles. Splendid fielding cut 
off one run at the plate and retired 
the side with bases full. The Pres- 
byterians added three more in the 
eighth but with the exception of the 
second, Pacific never secured more 
than one hit in an inning. 

Saturday, June 2, was Pacific's 
big day. Monmouth was the victim 
and the slaughter took place on the 
P. C. field. A triple, seven doubles 
and nine singles netted nineteen 
runs while the visitors made but 
three off Woodward's delivery. In 
six times at bat, H. Terrell slammed 
out a triple, three doubles and two 
singles. The whole team played fine 
ball both at bat and in the field. 

This makes three wins out of six 
games which is not bad when it is 
considered that seven men were 
playing new positions, four players 
were academy men and only two 
men on the team were over nineteen 
years of age. The great improve- 
ment made during the season corres- 
ponds favorably with the two scores 
against Linfield, 15 to 1 on April 27 
and 8 to 7 on May 25. In every 
way Pacific can well be proud of the 
showing made by her team this year 
and judging from the style of ball 
played in the J ast three games some 
colleges not so far away in the Wil- 
lamette valley are going to hustle 
if they beat the Quakers in 1924. 

Nine men who received letters 
for baseball are: H. Terrell, catcher; 
W. Crozer, pitcher and short; W. 
Woodward, pitcher and short, W. 
Sweet, first; B. Terrell, second; D. 
Woodward, third; W. Elliott, left; 
Everest, center; Haworth, right. 

Leading batters were H. Terrell, 
408; Everest, 370. Everest made 
eighteen putouts in center in five 
games. Sweet of the Academy play- 
ed a splendid game at first, holding 
everything and making but one er- 
ror. Crozer and Woodward pitched 
good ball and were never hit hard 
though they struck out but few bat- 
ters. The team's batting average 
for the season was .230. 

o 

SURPRISE! ! 

A mystery was floating in the air. 
Little groups were seen plotting and 
planning. Spoken words were hush- 
ed. 

Just before nightfall a crowd of 
young folks gathered before the col- 
lege building with Lizzies and auto- 
mobiles. The popular cry was 
"Where's Dick?" and "Does Dick 
Know?" Soon a Chevrolet came 
tearing up the drive and shot past 
the watching group. "That's Dick" 
cried half a dozen. But the next 
question was to get Dick before he 
got away. You see this was a sur- 
prise on Eldon Everest given by his 
father, W. R. Everest, with the help 
of some of the P. C. folk. The base- 
ball men and their friends were in- 
vited. 

The crowd headed for Heater's 
house near Springbrook, a splendid 
place for a bunch to have a good 
time. After everybody had warmed 
a wee bit by the double fire place, 
they went outside and played games. 
Indoor games and music wer e played 
and then came the main issue of the 
evening — The Strawberry Feed ! 
Oh those delicious big rip e straw- 
berries and real cream! ! ! Yum! 
Yum! Yells were given for all 
concerned; and with a yell, lets end 
this article. Rah! rah! for Dick. 



FOURTH YEARS ARE 

DELIGHTED WITH PROGRAM 



A packed house greeted the Acad- 
emy Seniors Friday evening, May 25, 
1923, when they gave their Class 
Day program. 

The fiist number on the program 
was the Prophesy which was given 
by "The Three Fates," Marie Hester, 
Ruth Whitlock and Mildred Hadley. 
After the fate of each of the class 
was given, the thread of the unfort- 
unate person was drawn out from 
the spindle and severed by shears of 
death. Many of the class are to be 
famous people. Marie Hester is to 
b e president of the United States, 
Louise Nelson is going to grow 
"green things" for freshmen in the 
North Pole region; Mildred Hadley 
is going to convert the whole 
world; Ralph Hester will be a great 
doctor; Laurence Crozer is to be a 
novelist, and Esthel Gulley will be- 
long to a vaudeville tumbling com- 
pany. 

A very pleasing piano duet was 
next played by Helen Baird and Iva 
Dell Crozer. 

Supposedly in 1936, Iva Dell 
Crozer and Hazel Newhouse explored 
a trunk of priceless possessions 
packed on their class day, among 
which were Zella Straw's rolling 
pin, Iva Dell Crczer's note, Laurence 
Crozer's hat, and Ralph Hester's 
rose. Hazel Newhouse read the will, 
which was found in an old coat, in 
which all their possessions were left 
to various people including a silent 
gun for the study hall to Donald 
Crozer, Helen Baird's artistic ability 
to Alice Laudien, and to Retha 
Tucker, a seat where she can lean 
against the wall. 

The playlet "The Teeth of the Gift 
Horse," was next given by a well 
chosen cast. Ralph Hester as Rich- 
ard Butler, Laurence Crozer as Ches- 
ter Blake, Elizabeth Silver as Flor- 
ence Butler, Louise Nelson as Aunt 
Marietta Williams, Esther Haworth 
as Anne Fisher, and Esthel Gulley 
as Katie, the maid, all acted their 
parts excellently. 

As specialties of the play, which 
were very much appreciated, Flor- 
ence Butler sang "Absent" with 
piano accompaniment and Anne 
Fisher sang "Perfect Day" accom- 
panying herself with the banjo. 

The program was concluded by the 
class song. 

o 

ACADEMY PERSONALS 

Rose Ellen Hale was at Pacific 
City May 30. 

Zella Straw visited school May 28 
and June 1. 

Aunt Marietta's vases were very 
striking on the window sill of the 
Academy Study hall. 

A company of Portland people 
were at Newberg to attend the Class 
Day program of the Pacific Academy 
Class of '23. 

Bernice Hinshaw, Bennie Hunt- 
ington, Rose Ellen Hale an< 1 Ivor 
Jones were among those present at 
th e Tennis tournament at Salem. 

The Academy seniors hav e hung 
their pennant. It is a very pretty 
and original production of purple 
and white felt. There is an old time 
custom and tradition for each gradu- 
ating class to leav e a pennant as a 
parting gift to the Academy. 
o 

The Quaker nine crossed bats with 
the heavy sluggers from Linfield col- 
lege on May 25, losing by the close 
score of 8 to 7. Five errors in the 
two innings gave the Baptists six 
runs to one for Pacific. Air-tight 
ball in the last seven innings held 
the visitors to two more counters. 
Pacific made one in th e first, two in 
the third and one in the seventh. 
The last of the ninth began with the 
score 8 to 4 but, before it was over 
three runners crossed the plate on 
an error, a walk, two singles and a 
long double. With men on first and 



second it looked bad for the visitors 
but a quick snap of the ball to first 
caught the runner napping and the 
game was over. Pacific made ten 
hits to Linfield's eight and should 
have won the game except for errors 
in the first inning, all on the part 
of the shortstop. P. C. retired four- 
teen batters on caught flies some of 
which would have don e credit to a 
professional ball team. 

o 

CLASS '23 GRADUATES 

WITH HIGH HONORS 



(Continued from page one) 



He called men from a comparatively 
easy task, to one that would require 
all the manhood and courage that 
they possessed. 

The living Christ is the solution 
to the problems of today said the 
speaker. He is in all good things; 
the modern social uprising was 
doubtless a part of Jesus work. H» 
ig to be found always ready to help; 
"Nearer than breathing, 
Nearer than hands and feet." 
Then showing how Ghandi, the great 
Indian lawyer had thru the Christ 
principles swayed his countrymen in 
a passive revolt against oppression; 
Mr. Hinkle closed his address by an 
appeal to the class of '23 to trans- 
late the Christian spirit into real 
life. 

Other members on the program 
were: Two selections on the piano 
by Mrs. Blythe Owen Cramlett, play- 
ed in her delightfully fascinating 
manner; two appropriate songs by 
Professor Hull, in his rich, clear 
voice, and the conferring of the de- 
grees by President Levi T. Penning- 
ton. The total scholarship of this 
class was exceptionally high: Miss 
Harriett Hodgin receiving the Penn 
College scholarship for the best 
work, and Cecil F. Hinshaw of the 
Junior class, receiving the Junior 
prize which is bestowed at the same 
time. Rev. Paul H. Lewis pro- 
nounced the benediction. The 
members of the class are: Richard 
A. Haworth, Springbrook, Or.; Miss 
Flora E. Campbell, Sherwood, Ore.; 
Miss Harriett Hodgin, Newberg, 
Ore.; Gladys M. Scott, Newberg. 
Ore.; Theodore Cramlett, Newberg, 
Ore. 



FOURTH YEARS RECEIVE 

THEIR DIPLOMAS 



Continued from page one) 



nerve," no man knows his strength 
until he has used every ounce he 
has. The great ideal before this 
graduating class is the advancement 
of the Kingdom of God in some 
chosen field. Everything one has 
must be put into the Christian life, 
if one would succeed in helping to 
win the victory for Christ, who is 
the true teammate, and always 
ready to help if you have done your 
part. 

A piano solo, "To Spring," beaut- 
ifully played by Miss Delight Carter, 
followed the address by President 
Pennington, and then the presenta- 
tion of the hard earned diplomas by 
Professor Conover. The benediction 
by Reverend Fred E. Carter, con- 
cluded the progarm. 

The members composing this class 
are as follows: Helen Baird, New- 
berg; Laurence Crozer, Newberg; 
Iva Dell Crozer, Salem; Esthel Gul- 
ly, Newberg; Mildred Hadley, Port- 
land; Esther Haworth, Newberg; 
Marie Hester, Newberg; Ralph Hes- 
ter, Newberg; Louise Nelson, New- 
berg; Elizabeth Silver, Newberg; 
Zella Straw, Sherwood, Or.; Ruth 
Whitlock, Newberg. The four re- 
ceiving diplomas from the Commer- 
cial school are: Mary K. Elliott, 
Newberg; Reatha I. Fisher, Dundee, 
Or.; Amy Leuders, Newberg; L Lu- 
cille Johnson, Newberg. 



STUDENT VOLUNTEER 

VIS ITS COLLEGE 

Miss Edith Sanderson, student 
volunteer secretary from New York 
city, who is visiting many of the 
colleges in the United States where 
there are student volunteer bands, 
spent one day on the campus of Pa- 
cific College and gave a very inspi- 
rational talk to the students during 
the chapel hour. Miss Sanderson, is 
assigned as a missionary to Turkey, 
where she goes next October. The 
good wishes of the students of Pa- 
cific go with her to that very needy 
field. 

o 

Patronize Crescent advertisers. 



KIENLE & SONS 
PIANOS 
Musical Merchandise 

MUSIC, STATIONERY, ETC. 
504 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



CAMPBELL'S CONFECTIONEY 

Hoefffler's Chocolates 
"MACBETH" 

Shakespeare's Classic, for Sale 



SHOE SHINE PARLOR 
Best of Shines Efficient Service 
Candy Bars, Good Confections 

BOB WALKER 



NEWBERG BAKERY 

404 First Street 
Best of Bread; Finest Cakes, 
Pies like Mother nsed to make. 



You Get Your Money's Worth 
at the 
GEM BARBER SHOP 

"PINK" WILLIAMS, Proprietor 



RYGG THE TAILOR 
Tailoring, French Dry Cleaning, 
Alterations, Pressing 

NEW HOFFMAN PRESS 

602% FIRST STREET 



C. J. BREIER COMPANY 

Everything in Men's Furnishings 

at Reasonable Prices 
CLOTHING SHOES 



J. C. PORTER & CO. 
General Merchandise 

Your patronage appreciated 
PHONE BLACK 28 



CITY MEAT MARKET 
"The Home of Good Meats" 

Delivery before and after school 
Phone Red 66 

MOORE & SON 



"Listen In" 

WHAT YOU EAT AND WHAT 
YOU WEAR 

Get it at the 

"GOOD GOODS" HOME 

Miller Mercantile Co. 

"Good Goods" 



W. W. HOLUNGSWORTH CO. 

THE STORE OF QUALITY 

Furniture, Carpets, 
Undertakers 

500 First St. Newberg, Ore. 



JOKES 

Chem. Lab. 

Horace — "Spud's got too strong a 
smell of ammonium hydroxide over 
there, I can't work." 

Spud — "I'm trying to save my sole 
before it gets all burned up." 

Horace- -"It'll take more than 
ammonium hydroxide to save your 
soul." 



French Class 
Emma Fort — "How in pronuncia- 
tion do you tell the defference be- 
tween death and the moorB in 
French?" Be careful Emma. 



DE. THOS. W. HESTER 
Physician and Surgeon 
Office in Dixon Building 
NEWBERG. - OREGON 



Sherlock's Restaurant 

BIG EATS FOR 
LITTLE MONEY 



Flora Campbell — "I'm thru with 
hell and can't find anything very 
definite about the devil." 

We think Flora was talking about 
her thesis. 



We would suggest that the mind 
which decorated the Junior-Senior 
banquet room in "Dog wood" be re- 
quired to pass an examination in 
botany before a diploma is given 
them. 



Charlotte — "Iva Dell, are you 
waiting for some one?" 

Iva Dell — "No! I'm just hoping 
somebody might come along." 



/ > 

Yours for Service and Quality 
ELECTRIC SHOE SHOP 

JASPER BALES, Proprietor 



C. A. MORRIS 
OPTICIAN 
JEWELER 



CLARENCE BUTT 
Attorney 

Office second floor Union Block 



DR. JOHN S. RANKIN 
Physician & Surgeon 
Office Phone Black 171 
Residence Phone Gray 171. 
Office over TJ. S. National Bank 



Sophomores and some preparatory 
students need to be "psyched" to 
account for their weird dreams. 
o 

ALUMNI NOTES 

Dr. Claude A. Lewis '12 and his 
wife, of Fairfield, Wash., wer e in 
Newberg for the first days of the 
commencement exercises. 

Rollin W. Kirk '98 acted as toast- 
master at the annual alumnae din- 
ner on Wednesday evening, June 13, 
when about sixty-five alumnae and 
guests spent a delightful evening in 
Wood-Mar hall. 

At the annual Alumni business 
meeting, held June 13, the following 
officers were elected: 

President Victor Rees '12 

Vice-Pres. and Treas 

Flora Campbell, '23 

Secretary . . . ' Stella Hubbard 

Member College Board .... 

Clarence J. Edwards '93. 

May Lamb of the class of '99 came 
to Oregon to attend yie commence- 
ment exercises this year, and to visit 
later with her sister, Gertrude Lamb 
Whiteis, at Terrebonne, Oregon. 

It was a pleasant surprise to many 
of us to see J. Huber Haworth '07 
and his family, of Puento, Cal. The 
Haworths drove their car through 
to Oregon, and will stay for several 
weeks. 

M. Eunice Lewis '05 is planning to 
be in Berkeley, Cal., again where 
she will study in the summer school 
of the University of California. 

Perry D. Macy '07 is attending 
the summer session of the University 
of Washington. 

o 

THE SPIRITUAL LIFE 

IS VAST ENTERPRISE 



COLLEGE PHARMACY 

E. W. HODSON. Reg. Phar. 
School Supplies, Drugs, 
Confections 
Corner First and Meridian 



Will B. Brooks 
PRINTER 

410 First St. Phone Black 22 



(Continued from page one) 

that associate with us. To be sure 
of its rightful quality we must know 
God, and then Light will be within 
rather than darkness, and shall 
warm and quicken into life all those 
about us. 

SENIOR CLASS PROGRAM 
SCORES B I G 



HIT 



(Continued from page one) 



pleasureable because it was so char- 
acteristically the work of '23. The 
class owes much credit to Miss Eu- 
nice Lewis and Mr. and Mrs. Chase 
Conover, who coached the plays. 



Pacific College 

PLAN TO ATTEND NEXT YEAR 

COLLEGE 

PREPARATORY SCHOOL 

COMMERCIAL SCHOOL 
SCHOOL OF MUSIC 

Bigger and Better Every Year 

STRONGER FACULTY 

INCREASED BUILDINGS 

ENLARGED LIBRARY 

BETTER EQUIPMENT 



For Catalogue and Other Information, address 
THE PRESIDENT 

Pacific College 

Newberg, Oregon 



E. C. BAIRD 
GENERAL MERCHANDISE 
WE APPRECIATE YOUR PATRONAGE 
Phone Red 37 



UNITED STATES NATIONAL BANK 
ROLL OF HONOR BANK 
Capital and Surplus $100,000 

Accounts of students, faculty and friends of Pacific College invited 
INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS 



FIRST NATIONAL BANK 
Newberg, Oregon 
KEEP YOUR RESERVE FUNDS WITH US 

INTEREST PAID ON SAVINGS ACCOUNTS 



Ralph W. VanValin 



DENTISTRY 
X-Ray Diagnosis 



OVER U. S. BANK 



Graham's Drug Store 

SCHOOL SUPPLIES KODAK FINISHING 

HEADQUARTERS FOR PERIODICALS 



D D 11 Time is Here, and Our Stock 

DaSe Ball b Complete 

Parker Hardware Co. 



CHEERFUL SERVICE AT 

Larkin-Prince Hardware Co. 



BASEBALL SUPPLIES